Wednesday, December 13, 2006

5 more points and a painful draw in Round 3

My result was 1-1=1. The new rating will be around 1889

Round 3 Me vs Raymond Hayes(2100) draw
I fell for 3 fold repetition in time trouble in a completely winning position against floored out 2100 player Raymond Hayes. I stopped taking notation after move 49.

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Round 2Russ Montney (1842) vs. me Loss

White tries an unusual second move. Instead of playing 2...d6 or 2...d5 I tried 2...Qa5. That was not that bad, but after I played 7...c5 I was in a bad way. I had to play 7...d6

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Round 1 Me vs James Coons (1883) win

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My opponent usually gets in time trouble and is known for memorizing openings. I knew that I could get a good time advantage if I varied from the main lines. I played 7. h3 and after that had a good advantage on the clock. Towards the end of the game I had about 20 min. and he had less than 2. Some of the moves I made toward the end (eg. 24 Qh5) were made not because I thought they were the best moves, but because I though they would give him the most discomfort with the clock ticking away towards zero.

12 comments:

  1. Ivan-
    Be careful! This past Tuesday I was playing in a one game/week tournament and had only 5 seconds to make 15 moves to time control. It was roughly equal but my opponent (who had nearly 20 minutes) was moving quickly to try to take away MY thinking time. He hung a piece! When you have a time edge, you should still try to play objectively best moves. Yury Shulman said it bes- they put your opponent under lasting pressure.

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  2. That said, 24. Qh5 was a good move, anyway.

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  3. You will never be able to be a good player, forget about getting into 2000+ if you keep calculating one point or two after each game.

    Evaluate if you are worth of 2000 and only then see if you are going towards that.

    Focus on the game, not the rating points

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  4. I'm not the "anonymous" above, but I agree 100% with his assessment. I don't understand your obsession with ratings. If you play well, wins and rating points will come. And if 2000 never does come, so what? Chess is about the game, not about the rating.

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  5. I am a third Anonymous. I agree with previous posters, however if you seriously put a lot of energy into improving, then you WILL improve sooner or later. As stated earlier, don't count individual points. When you play like an expert, your rating will naturaly hit 2000.
    Also, try to concentrate on studying more than playing. I would suggest only playing in 6-12 tournaments per year, instead of one every weekend. It is better for your development.

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  6. Why don't you show us your losses? Those are 10 times more important than your wins, especially if you want to improve. You totally skipped over your loss to a lower rated player. It may be "embarrassing" to lose to someone lower rated, but it is critical you analyze those games.

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  7. The "theory" on time pressure situations is pretty clear - don't play differently because your opponent is in time pressure, or you stand an excellent chance of psyching yourself out.

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